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Lilly in Ireland

Colonel Eli Lilly started the company in 1876. His motto to his employees, and all that followed within the company, was: “Take what you find here and make it better and better.” In 1923, Lilly launched the first commercially available insulin product. Their focus on diabetes care continued and in 1982, the company launched Humulin – insulin that was manufactured but identical to that produced by the human body.

Abbott in Ireland

Abbott was founded in 1888 by Dr Wallace C. Abbott in Chicago, USA. The company is involved in the research, development, manufacture, and marketing of a range of products. Their portfolio spans the breadth of healthcare including medical devices, diagnostics, branded generic pharmaceuticals, and nutritionals.

Boston Scientific in Ireland

Boston Scientific is one of the biggest MedTech companies in the world – employing over 41,000 people around the world and selling products in 115 countries. The company was founded in 1979 with the aim of creating less invasive medical devices and procedures, and they continue to innovate across expanding areas of medicine. Today, their medical devices are used to diagnose and treat patients with issues in the areas of cardiology, urology, endoscopy and many more.

Pfizer in Ireland

Pfizer is the world’s largest research-based pharmaceutical company with operations spanning the globe. Its research headquarters are located in Groton, Connecticut, America. Pfizer develops and produces vaccines and medicines for a range of conditions in the areas of oncology, infections and infestations, cardiology, ophthalmology, neurology and psychiatry. It has been in Ireland for over 50 years and currently has 3 manufacturing plants located there.

GMP: Good Manufacturing Practices

What are good manufacturing practices (GMP)? Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP) – are a set of product quality regulations that have the force of law and require that manufacturers and packagers of medicines and medical devices take steps to make sure their products are safe, pure and effective.

6 Top Skills for Entry-Level Pharma Manufacturing Jobs in the UK

What does the ideal candidate for an entry-level job in pharma manufacturing look like? We’ve analysed job adverts from pharma employers across the UK to find out. In this article we’re specifically looking at “soft” or transferable skills, counting down to the most popular. No matter what your educational background or work experience is, it’s likely that you can boost the case for yourself as a suitable candidate by demonstrating you have these skills. And while this is a good general guide, the most important thing to remember is to carefully read each individual job advert and highlight the skills mentioned within it as your tailor your CV for that application.

The Pharma Industry on YouTube

Whether you're trying to get to grips with what working in the industry "looks" like or you're preparing for an interview, it's always valuable to hear directly from employers. YouTube is a great place to do this. Not every company has a YouTube channel but those that do, are a really valuable resource. We've [...]

How to Write a CV – Part 8: Formatting

If you’ve worked through these articles in order, you’ve seen how a CV builds section by section. We’ve thought about the content that should go in every section so that you’re doing the best job possible at selling yourself to potential employers. We’ve also talked a little about layout options for each section.

How to Write a CV – Part 7: References

As soon as you start your job hunt you’ll need to consider who you can use as references. You’ll typically need 2 people, at least one should be a previous employer (and usually you’ll need to include your last employer). Former employers are legally obligated to give basic reference details for their employees but if you’re using someone who wasn’t a former employer, you should check ahead of time that they are willing to be a reference for you. Then you have to decide if/how you’re presenting this information on your CV.. If you choose to include it, the references section should be a brief section on your CV.

How to Write a CV – Part 6: Skills, Hobbies & Interests

The purpose of this Section: To give an employer an insight into how you spend your personal time and the type of person you are. You might historically have viewed this section as a tick-box exercise that you only include because you “should”. But this section can actually be really useful in convincing someone you’ve got relevant skills for the role. This can be particularly helpful if you can demonstrate a skill listed on the job advert that you’ve not been able to demonstrate within another section of your CV

How to Write a CV – Part 5: Employment History

Purpose of this section: To give an employer a full but concise overview of your employment history, highlighting relevant experience and skills. The “Employment History” section of your CV should be far more than dates and a list of the duties of your job. By adding in specific achievements, tangible details and transferable skills, your previous employment section can be a highly persuasive section of your CV, even if you’re making a mid-career change.